Archive for Themes

‘Useful idiots’ or what? A reply to Jonathan Mirsky »

December 15th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, China

A letter published under the heading ‘Mirsky is mistaken’ in the Spectator on 11 December 2010.

Diggers and Levellers in Red China? »

October 30th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Englishness and British national identity

‘On 1 October 1954, Sir Hugh Casson, the urbane professor of interior design who had been director of architecture at the Festival of Britain, found himself standing by the Tiananmen Gate in the ancient and still walled city of Peking…’ An article in the Guardian Review.

‘The end of the public university in England’? »

October 28th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Found Objects, Kulchur

James Vernon’s thoughts on the future of the humanities in British universities.

Don’t count the turds: on Owen Hatherley and The New Ruins of Great Britain »

October 26th, 2010 | Posted in: Art & its applications, Articles General, Englishness and British national identity

A review published in Architecture Today (212, October 2010, p. 6).

Here Comes the Boss – industrial democracy at the Glacier Metal Factory »

October 10th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Found Objects, Miscellaneous rigs of the time

Alan Sugar and his dreadful would-be apprentices aside, is it likely nowadays that the British media would support a serious inquiry into the all-devouring creed we have come to know as ‘management’?

‘Relocating the High Lyric Voice’ – a reading and discussion with Robin Blaser, John Kinsella, Denise Riley, Peter Blegvad and Iain Sinclair »

September 15th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Literature

An extract from a conversation broadcast on ‘Night Waves’ (BBC Radio Three), 22 January 1997.

Travels in Keillerland: “The Future of Landscape and the Moving Image” »

September 10th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Englishness and British national identity

Over the last three or so years, I’ve been involved in a collaborative project funded as part of the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s ‘Landscape and Environment’ programme, and based at the Royal College of Art in London…

Saving ‘Versions’ – with no thanks to Microsoft »

August 26th, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Encounters, Found Objects

My requirements from word-processing software are pretty simple. I still reckon that the most amenable I’ve ever used was the ‘Word’ for Macs programme that I had on a Macintosh SE way back in the Dark Ages. I remember feeling impressed that it had been worth anybody’s time to come up with an invention that seemed so perfectly suited to the requirements of writers, students, and other characteristically unmoneyed types. Having transferred to PCs at a time when Apple seemed to be going nowhere (between the first Powerbooks and the G2s as I recall), I’ve since reconciled myself to ‘Word’ as it comes bundled up in Microsoft Office. I have done this despite the fact that my software nowadays seems to think, quite wrongly, that it knows who I am. Increasingly, it is convinced that I should be writing business letters, or corporate reports in which ‘bullet-points’ and tables feature prominently…

Remembering Colin St John Wilson’s answer to Prince Charles – an article for Architecture Today »

August 26th, 2010 | Posted in: Art & its applications, Articles General

I wrote this piece earlier in the summer (it appeared in Architecture Today 209, June 2010) . Having gone back, after several years, and seen the present state of Charles’s ‘model’ development at Poundbury in Dorchester, it seems all the more important to remember that the ‘Modernism’ against which it is designed to speak was never […]

Just Start Digging: a conversation about Memory and the Framing of Heritage »

February 21st, 2010 | Posted in: Articles General, Heritage & History

The final version of this conversation with Jeremy Davies is published as ‘Just start digging: Memory and the framing of heritage’ in a special issue of Memory Studies entitled ‘Nostalgia and the Shapes of History’, edited by Nadia Atia & Jeremy Davies (3:3, July 2010, 196-203).